BioBlitz & Cultural Festival

BioBlitz offers a fun and hands-on opportunity to observe and document the biodiversity that thrives in the lava flows and native rainforests of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes.  Themed E Ho‘omau, we perpetuate our links to the living environment through experiencing and learning about the amazing plants and animals in the park.  Individuals and organizations at the forefront of conservation, science and traditional Hawaiian culture will lead participants on a variety of field trips.

This year’s BioBlitz offers five hikes and one drop-in station.  Registration is required for all hikes and space is limited. Please visit the BioBlitz page for more details and hike registration.

Hiding in Plain Sight: Insects and Spiders of Kīlauea

DROP-IN STATION

No reservation necessary, drop in any time between 10:00 and 1:00 to see who you can find!  Entomologists will introduce you the impressive insects and secretive spiders lurking under the leaves.  Finding and identifying new and unique critters is lots of fun for all ages!

Kīlauea Military Detainment Camp

Join Park Archaeologists for a walking tour at Kīlauea Military Camp.  Get a glimpse into history and learn about the role KMC played during WWII.

Meet at the BioBlitz tent at the festival (Kīlauea Military Camp).  Please arrive 15 minutes early to check in.

Na Mea Kanu o Ka Hula

Join a Kumu Hula to learn about the different types of plants used in hula on an easy hike along the rim of Kīlauea.

Meet at the BioBlitz tent at the festival (Kīlauea Military Camp).  Please arrive 15 minutes early to check in.

Tools of the Trade

Join Park Archaeologists for an easy hike along the Crater Rim Trail and learn about Hawaiian adze (stone tool) production along the way!

Meet at the BioBlitz tent at the festival (Kīlauea Military Camp).  Please arrive 15 minutes early and be prepared for a short drive to the start of you hike after checking in.

Botanical Bliss at the Kilauea Summit

Botanists will lead you on an inventory hike along the rim of Kīlauea.  See how many plants you can identify and learn new species from some of our resident experts.

Meet at the BioBlitz tent at the festival (Kīlauea Military Camp).  Please arrive 15 minutes early to check in.

Feathers in the Forest

Join Ornithologists on an inventory hike through the forest.  Get a glimpse of native honeycreepers and listen for the Hawaiian thrush, see how many species you can identify!

Meet at the BioBlitz tent at the festival (Kīlauea Military Camp).  Please arrive on time and be prepared for a short drive to the start of your hike after checking in.

MY HAWAI’I STORY – Calling all Middle School Students – Deadline to APPLY March 10, 2017

MY HAWAI’I STORY CONTEST – 2017

HE WA‘A, HE MOKU MALAMA HONUACaring for Our Island Earth

ENTRY DETAILS

The 2017 My Hawai‘i creative writing contest is open to all middle school students (6-8th grade) in the state. Students are invited to submit their best story or poem that addresses the theme, ”He Wa’a, He Moku – Malama Honua: Caring for Our Island Earth” to align with the 2017 Hawai‘i Conservation Conference theme.

“He wa‘a he moku, he moku he wa‘a,” translates simply as “the canoe is an island, and the island is a canoe.” This theme highlights the need to treat the resources of our island home, and island earth, as carefully as we would the limited water and food carried on a wa‘a.

Entries should tell a story, not simply share information. Acrostic poems will not be accepted.

* All middle school students in Hawai‘i are eligible. * Only one entry per student will be accepted. * All entries must be submitted online.

SUBMIT Submit entries online at: CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT ENTRY

Entries are due by 5:00pm on Friday, March 10, 2017.

FORMAT Submit contact information in the entry form online, but do not reveal the student’s name or school anywhere in the submission to maintain anonymity in the evaluation process. All entries will be reviewed by a panel of judges with no access to student identification information or grade level.

By submitting an entry, the student and school authorize the My Hawai‘i Story Project to use the stories or poems for educational purposes including, but not limited to, print and web materials.

EVALUATION CRITERIA All entries will be judged using the following criteria: * Theme relevance – how well did you connect to  the theme and to Hawaii’s unique environment? * Clarity of message – how well did you express your   ideas? * Creativity and originality – your work must be your    own! Entries will be assessed by how well you express your ideas using appropriate grammar and writing style.

WINNERS Winning entries will be announced on May 12, 2017. The winning entries will be published in the My Hawai‘i Story Project anthology. Winners will receive a copy of the booklet, an award certificate, and other special prizes. We hope all contest winners will be able to attend the awards ceremony at the Hawai‘i Conservation Conference in July 2017. In addition, all state libraries will receive a copy of the anthology for their collections.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Contest details and this flyer are available online at: www.hawaiiconservation.org/my-hawaii Share the flyer with teachers and post it for students and parents! Questions? Contact: myhawaiistory@gmail.com

PROJECT PARTNERS Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Hawai‘i Coastal Zone Management Program, Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance, Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance Foundation, Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resources – Division of Forestry and Wildlife – Division of Aquatic Resources, Hawai‘i Department of Education, Hawai‘i Environmental Education Alliance, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, The Pacific Writers’ Connection, and  Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument

Saturday Walk in the Park – MAY 2017

This monthly program normally held on second Sundays (this month we will hold our hike on Saturday, due to Mother’s Day) is aimed at bringing together the members of the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park to explore the park’s beautiful trails.

Kīlauea Iki

Descend through a lush rain forest to the floor of the solidified, however still steaming Kīlauea Iki Crater lava lake. Peer into the 1959 vent that erupted to a height of 1900 feet located below the Pu‘u Pua‘i cinder cone.

Of interest: Walking through a rain forest, viewing native birds, walk on the 1959 lava lake, view steam vents, cinder cones and spatter cones.

  • Difficulty: Moderate to challenging – Steep and rocky, descent & ascent 400 feet (122m).
  • Distance and hiking time: 4 mile (6.4km) loop. Approximately 2 to 3 hours.
  • Distance from Visitor Center to trailhead: 2 miles (3.2km).
  • Trail begins: At the Kīlauea Iki parking lot on Crater Rim Drive. You may go either way from the trailhead. Going left will take you to the Thurston Lava Tube parking lot and then down to the floor of Kīlauea Iki. Going right will take hikers through the rain forest on the crater rim and down to the crater floor.
  • Bring: Water, food, hat, sunscreen and rain gear. Be prepared for hot, dry, wet, windy weather conditions and steep and rocky terrain.

Ahu (stacked rocks) mark the trail across the crater floor. Please do not disturb them or build new ones.

This event is presented by the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.  Program cost is FREE for Friends members.  Non-members are welcome to join the Friends in order to attend.  And, of course, additional donations are always accepted.  Park entrance fees apply.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

 

Sunday Walk in the Park – FEBRUARY 2017

This monthly program on second Sundays is aimed at bringing together the members of the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park to explore the park’s beautiful trails.  This month’s 2.5-mile round-trip walk explores Mauna Ulu.

Experience a lava landscape from the 1969-1974 Mauna Ulu flow. Walk by lava tree molds and climb 210 feet (64m) to the top of a forested cinder cone, Pu‘u Huluhulu (hairy hill). View Mauna Ulu’s steaming sheild, which is similar to the now active Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone in the distance. On a clear day you can see Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea and the Pacific Ocean.

Of interest: Pāhoehoe and ‘a‘ā lava, kīpuka (old land surrounded by new land), lava tree molds, cinder cones, lava rampart, native pioneer plants and trees and panoramic vista.

  • Difficulty: Moderate – Most of the route is easy, but includes a 1/4 mile steep climb up Pu‘u Huluhulu cone.
  • Distance and hiking time: 2.5 miles (4.0km) roundtrip, Approximately 2.0 – 3.0 hours.
  • Trail Begins: Approximately 100 yards (91.4m) from the Mauna Ulu parking area. Ahu (stacked rocks) mark the trail across the lava flows. Please do not disturb them or build new ones. Stay on the trail.
  • Bring water, food, hat, sun protection and rain gear.
  • Be Prepared for hot, dry, wet, windy weather conditions and rocky terrain.

Dependent on the wind direction, volcanic fumes may be present along this trail.

Protect delicate lava formations. Surface patterns and lava trees are fragile. Reduce your impact. Please do not touch these formations.

This event is presented by the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.  Program cost is FREE for Friends members.  Non-members are welcome to join the Friends in order to attend.  And, of course, additional donations are always accepted.  Park entrance fees apply.